Overactive Bladder

Overactive Bladder general health Urology Clinics of North Texas

Overactive bladder is a condition that causes your bladder to start urination at the wrong time. Signs of overactive bladder include: urinating more than eight times a day, having a sudden urge to urinate, or urinary incontinence.

Some conditions can cause overactive bladder, including urinary tract infections, bladder stones, and neurological disorders. Treatment of underlying conditions may relieve symptoms of overactive bladder. If an untreatable condition causes overactive bladder, your urologist may recommend behavioral techniques, medication, or targeted exercises.

Urologists at Urology Clinics of North Texas are expertly trained in treating overactive bladder. Schedule an appointment today if you are having urinary symptoms.

Overactive Bladder general health Urology Clinics of North Texas

Overactive bladder is caused by muscles of the bladder involuntarily contracting, even when there is not much urine in your bladder. This muscle contraction causes an urgent need to urinate. There are conditions and risk factors that can cause overactive bladder, including:

  • Urinary tract infections
  • Bladder stones
  • Excess consumption of caffeine or alcohol
  • Neurological disorders, such as stroke or multiple sclerosis
  • Aging

Sometimes treatment of underlying conditions can relieve symptoms of an overactive bladder. Symptoms of an overactive bladder include:

  • A sudden, strong urge to urinate
  • Experiencing incontinence, when urine cannot be held
  • Frequent urination, more than eight times a day

Always consult your doctor about any urinary problems.

Overactive Bladder general health Urology Clinics of North Texas

If you have overactive bladder symptoms, your urologist will conduct a urine analysis to determine if you have an infection. Your urologist will also evaluate your medical history, looking for any other potential causes for overactive bladder symptoms. A physical exam will also be performed, focusing on your bladder and pelvic area.

Your doctor may also check to see if you are completely emptying your bladder during urination with an ultrasound. It is also common to measure the urine flow rate with a uroflowmeter.

Overactive Bladder general health Urology Clinics of North Texas

If overactive bladder is caused by behavioral habits or an underlying condition, that will be treated first.

If underlying condition treatment does not relieve symptoms of an overactive bladder, treatment options may include:

Behavioral techniques

Your doctor may suggest bladder training to strengthen your muscles, including scheduled bathroom breaks and fluid management.
Pelvic floor muscle exercises, such as kegels to strengthen your muscles

Medication

Your doctor may prescribe medication to relax your bladder muscles if you have an overactive bladder.

Botox

Bladder injections, or Botox, may be injected into the bladder to paralyze muscles partially.

Surgery

Procedures involving surgery is for patients with severe symptoms who do not respond to other treatments. The goal of surgery is to improve the bladder’s ability to store and retain urine.

​Overactive bladder is more common in patients who have urinary tract infections, bladder stones, excess consumption of caffeine or alcohol, neurological disorders, such as stroke or multiple sclerosis, or old age.
You should urinate every 2-3 hours if you are regularly consuming liquid. This will prevent developing infections such as urinary tract infections that may cause incontinence.
Overactive bladder is caused by muscles of the bladder involuntarily contracting, even when there is not much urine in your bladder. This muscle contraction causes an urgent need to urinate.
Your urologist will get a medical history and conduct a physical exam. If needed, urine analysis and further imaging tests of your urinary muscles may be required.
Treatment options can vary based on the severity of incontinence. Treatments can include behavioral techniques such as bladder training and fluid management, pelvic floor muscle exercises, medication, Botox, or surgery.
Overactive Bladder general health Urology Clinics of North Texas

Overactive Bladder general health Urology Clinics of North Texas

Overactive bladder is a condition that causes your bladder to start urination at the wrong time. Signs of overactive bladder include: urinating more than eight times a day, having a sudden urge to urinate, or urinary incontinence.

Some conditions can cause overactive bladder, including urinary tract infections, bladder stones, and neurological disorders. Treatment of underlying conditions may relieve symptoms of overactive bladder. If an untreatable condition causes overactive bladder, your urologist may recommend behavioral techniques, medication, or targeted exercises.

Urologists at Urology Clinics of North Texas are expertly trained in treating overactive bladder. Schedule an appointment today if you are having urinary symptoms.

Overactive Bladder general health Urology Clinics of North Texas

Overactive bladder is caused by muscles of the bladder involuntarily contracting, even when there is not much urine in your bladder. This muscle contraction causes an urgent need to urinate. There are conditions and risk factors that can cause overactive bladder, including:

  • Urinary tract infections
  • Bladder stones
  • Excess consumption of caffeine or alcohol
  • Neurological disorders, such as stroke or multiple sclerosis
  • Aging

Sometimes treatment of underlying conditions can relieve symptoms of an overactive bladder. Symptoms of an overactive bladder include:

  • A sudden, strong urge to urinate
  • Experiencing incontinence, when urine cannot be held
  • Frequent urination, more than eight times a day

Always consult your doctor about any urinary problems.

Overactive Bladder general health Urology Clinics of North Texas

If you have overactive bladder symptoms, your urologist will conduct a urine analysis to determine if you have an infection. Your urologist will also evaluate your medical history, looking for any other potential causes for overactive bladder symptoms. A physical exam will also be performed, focusing on your bladder and pelvic area.

Your doctor may also check to see if you are completely emptying your bladder during urination with an ultrasound. It is also common to measure the urine flow rate with a uroflowmeter.

Overactive Bladder general health Urology Clinics of North Texas

If overactive bladder is caused by behavioral habits or an underlying condition, that will be treated first.

If underlying condition treatment does not relieve symptoms of an overactive bladder, treatment options may include:

Behavioral techniques

Your doctor may suggest bladder training to strengthen your muscles, including scheduled bathroom breaks and fluid management.
Pelvic floor muscle exercises, such as kegels to strengthen your muscles

Medication

Your doctor may prescribe medication to relax your bladder muscles if you have an overactive bladder.

Botox

Bladder injections, or Botox, may be injected into the bladder to paralyze muscles partially.

Surgery

Procedures involving surgery is for patients with severe symptoms who do not respond to other treatments. The goal of surgery is to improve the bladder’s ability to store and retain urine.

​Overactive bladder is more common in patients who have urinary tract infections, bladder stones, excess consumption of caffeine or alcohol, neurological disorders, such as stroke or multiple sclerosis, or old age.
You should urinate every 2-3 hours if you are regularly consuming liquid. This will prevent developing infections such as urinary tract infections that may cause incontinence.
Overactive bladder is caused by muscles of the bladder involuntarily contracting, even when there is not much urine in your bladder. This muscle contraction causes an urgent need to urinate.
Your urologist will get a medical history and conduct a physical exam. If needed, urine analysis and further imaging tests of your urinary muscles may be required.
Treatment options can vary based on the severity of incontinence. Treatments can include behavioral techniques such as bladder training and fluid management, pelvic floor muscle exercises, medication, Botox, or surgery.

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